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's the fault of election process. when you get elected, what's the first thing you want to do? you want to get reelected. in order to get reelected you need to bring the goodies to your constituency. unless there's a law or change the election process, that's going to continue add infini infinitem, forever. it's unfortunate, it's sad. unless there's a-- unless we outlaw pork, i don't see anything changing. >> brenda: we have ourselves to blame at the bottom. but jonas, let's talk about all the fork projects. this has been going on forever and ever and both parties love to feast on pork. in fact, you can't cut it out all at once, right? >> i imagine if they cut it out completely there would be no passing of any bills because it doesn't add up to a whole lot, but boils down to, it's not going to balance the budget. and second, it's the bribe use today get the senators in congress to vote for these bigger, more important bills which would never get passed if you couldn't-- you're getting a bridge and you're getting this and you're getting a university. and these pork projects as terrible as they
bigamist during her husband's election, rachel jackson dies of a heart attack. his knees becomes the what -- the white house hostess. during the next administration, mrs. van buren is the hostess for her father-in-law who is a widower. we will include your questions by phone, facebook, and twitter. life at 9 p.m. >> now, former republican discusses the future of the political parties. participants included haley barbour. it was held at the museum in washington dc and was moderated by kelly o'donnell. this is about 45 minutes. >> good morning. we are so glad to have you with us with this set of panelists who have not been on the sidelines. what i like about this is we're with people who have been in the room when decisions are made, they have been on the forefront when the sunshine of politics and the heat of politics has been bearing down on them. they know what it is like and can give us a road map of where things might be headed. we will have some fun, and because my day job lets me ask lots of questions, i want to make sure i ask the audience to think about things they want to hear fro
. the next elections next year are going to show, hopefully, the more mature response from the electorate. having said that, i quickly add the qualification of this will be, again, colored and tempered by the fears of being whipped up right now. among the islamist shia, there is a weapon they use, the sunnis are coming to get you. and that is now amplified by the sunnis arabs are coming to get you. that makes the fear even more potent. the best things that the sunni arabs in iraq should do is try to alleviate this year. most of the wider element is aware of the danger of this fear, of government out of control. coming back to muqtada, the next elections, if they are not colored by a fervor, might produce a more mature out, and provide a new crop of younger leaders who have been less contaminated by the events of recent years. there is a ray of hope there. >> if i could just add to that, i agree entirely with the ambassador's assessment of muqtada al-sadr. he himself does not know what he is doing the day after tomorrow. sadly, assassination can be effective and the assassination of his fa
. the former military ruler says that he wants to run in the next election and is unfazed by a death threat from the pakistan taliban. former president and general has threatened to come back on many occasions, but he is finally here. he comes home to a very different pakistan and the one that he left. he was a very unpopular figure when he left. here he used to have the support of the main political party. sources are telling us that they are not sure if they will do any kind of deal with him. in order to make this work, to have some kind of success in the general election, he needs to make alliances. at the moment he does not have the kind of political clout to make those alliances worthwhile. he needs to make deals with people. he said he wants to try to unite the people who are undecided, who are against the dynastic and family politics of pakistan. he wants to unite a people who are frustrated with the corruption endemic within pakistan in politics. a pakistani politician who used to be a former sports and has slashed -- has huge support when it comes to young people. he had a massive
. -- disease dizzily in washington is people care more about the next election than the future of the country. if we get to a grand bargaining, you would have some people quit worrying about whether or not to get reelected and fix the country. if we do not, it will be about people protecting their interests and their political position. the country will suffer. >> on that point, the house this week past by most measures what would be considered a highly political document -- their budget. it is a political document. >> this is highly political. lex i am not disagreeing. neither of these have a chance of becoming law. at are you a your colleagues not more time finding a middle ground instead of going through show but? -- showboat's? >> they want to get paid. that is number one. where finally a budget you can offer amendments and highlight things that need to be changed in the federal government is an important exercise. , 76example, last night senators voted to eliminate the medical device tax. if you put that in the budget, if it is allowed to come up, it will go through the senate and throug
after the election, senator dianne feinstein said it was too much. people were not ready for it. >> i get it. i get it. now with that, the dust settled and they did as they do with the exit polls. they analyze. there were ten issues. social issues was number five behind other issues. interestingly, it broke both ways. enthusiastic for bush and enthusiastic for kerry. >> scott: fast forward to 2007 and 2008. senator barack obama runs for president and comes to san francisco to raise money. word was he did not want to be photographed with you. was that true? >> willie brown and myself were doing the fund-raisers for him. one at a restaurant. he had strong opinions. a lot of folks had strong opinions. >> scott: was he worried? >> everyone was worried. i had that brief moment where the new person and the rising star and i was going to go to boston during the convention and speak. all of a sudden, calling up and i said i get it. all these folks that were surrounding me, moved aside and to your point, that was more hurtful than the predictable position of schwarzenegger. >> scott: fast forw
drinking? >> well, this is not new. chairman priebus when he was elected chair in 2011 was progressive to reach out to many groups and ancillary groups including the log cabin republicans and in fact, the first chairman to make it clear that corporate culture in the chairman's office that the rnc as soon as reince priebus came in was to be inclusive and welcoming. he took a lot of hits as being chairman and obviously re-elected. >> clark, take me in here, and don't filibuster me. >> sure. >> none of that played out. we heard none of that in the last election and we heard the exact opposite from the last election. >> well, you are talking about the platform which was like an anchor around our neck in the election cycle, and that was very clear amongst many in leadership which is why this growth and opportunity project is very important. it was a very aggressive and pragmatic approach and similar to the military operation that you do an after-action review, and the party was honest about our weaknesses and why we are are not attracting the voters that we should attract, and so, no, it is
in the 2014 midterms and then subsequently 2016 general election? >> well, alex, we've seen a clear shift in public opinion on this issue over the last ten years. it's been quite dramatic. all sorts of polls now, including the reuter's poll last week shows that the public supports gay marriage even civil unions. even in the south, the majority supports gay marriage or civil unions together. democrats are united on this issue. they say it's a big winner, especially among younger voters, and there's a real sort of active debate within the republican party about how to play this. there's a lot of people saying we've got to stop emphasizing these social issues because they are not working in our favor. however, if you're going to have a divisive 2016 primary, rick santorum is going to want to talk about that and that could really hurt them. >> do you think that will be the case in 2016? if you look at what has happened since gavin newson signed gay marriage in law, he performed the ceremonies himself there and made it legal, look how much things have ink changed in one decade. do you think it
] it had gotten back down to its proper level, and all was well. you know, the election's over, and the president has been reelected, and the new congress has been sworn in, and we have basically what we had before other than the fact we spent $4 billion to have a president be reelected, the senate remain in one party's hand and the house remain in the republicans' hands. we have, we have effectively, we have gridlock. we have now, we have variations on these new terms like sequester, and so last week in washington they called the snow that never came the snowquester. we have things like the fiscal cliff that we would have thought you'd jump off of and die. so we're going from crisis to crisis, and nothing in the election really changed that. because our beloved nation is divided, the direction we should take is undecided as well. and meanwhile, the power of compounding is not our friend. our recovery is the weakest it's been in modern times. our entitlement programs, everybody recognizes, are unsustainable, literally unsustainable and grow in magnitude without change. our regu
to get to is the political dynamics in terms of how it affects elections. and the biggest disease in washington in my opinion, is people care more about the next election than they do the future of the country. so if we get to a grand bargain ul have some people come off and quit worrying about whether or not they want to get reelected and try to fix the country and if we don't it will be about people protecting their political positions and the country will suffer markedly from it. >> on that point, the house this week passed what by most measures would be considered a highly political document, their budget. the senate is getting ready to pass its own budget which is another political document. neither -- >> it is just as highly political. >> i am not disagreeing. neither has a chance of becoming law. so i wonder why you and your colleagues aren't spending more time trying to find middle ground instead of going through what are effectively show votes. >> they want to get paid. and if they don't pass the budget they won't get paid. that's number one. number two, is having finally
in the world. we can rightly be proud of having elected a black president and see it as a historical achievement of our people in our struggle for freedom, justice and equity, the struggle continues. we cannot see it as an end in itself. nor can we be confused and think ,hat the election of one man the election of the man with the need for a rebuilding of a movement. -- for profound and radical change of society. and for bringing good in the world. we must reaffirm our role as a moral and social vanguard in this country. as martin luther king, malcolm x, harry a tuchman, frederick douglass and so many others have taught us, we must avoid the silence in the face of evil and injustice. a silence that would become a betrayer. a betrayer of the best of our ethical social justice [indiscernible] into betrayer of the struggling people of the world. including our own. what is our position on the congo? what about the invasion of africa and libya? what about haiti and its oppression? we must speak truth to power if we really believe in our tradition. if we have a commitment to our own faith.
freedom, social justice in the world. although we can rightly be proud of having elected a black president and see it as a historical achievement of our people in our struggle for freedom, justice and equity, the struggle continues. we cannot see it as an end in itself. nor can we be confused and think that the election of one man, the election of the man with the need for a rebuilding of a movement for profound and radical change of society. and for bringing good in the world. m
. the referendum on barack obama was the presidential election and look at the turnout -- the people that came out for him. you continue to misread the results. >> i hate to agree with you because you are trying to disagree with me, so it gets really complicated here. [laughter] i agree with you that barack obama is one of the great candidates in american history and that explains why the democrats did well in 2008 and 2012 -- we had a great candidate -- in 2010, when you neutralize the factor of the candidate, the republicans prevailed, which tells me that republican ideas are strong, and you have to have a candidate or a class of people that can explain it. >> that is the subject of the message to the american people, and they bought it. >>ut in 10, obacareas a factor and it will be a factor in 2014, do you not agree? >> it might very well be, but i will point out that we have returned to the days of yesteryear when dr. krauthammer was laboring in the democratic vineyards, and the explanation was ronald reagan won because he was a superior candidate, he was engaging, likeable and charismatic, a
elections. >> heather: plus, results from the $338 million powerball drawing. they in are in but only one ticket managed to get all six numbers. >> rick: you didn't buy it because you are here. >> heather: did you win? >> rick: i didn't buy a ticket. >> heather: we'll tell you where it was sold up next. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ly knows when you need to leave for the airport, how much traffic there is, and can have your boarding pass ready. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid-smart. droid-powerful. i took something for my sinuses, but i still have this cough. [ male announcer ] a lot of sinus products don't treat cough. they don't? [ male announcer ] nope, but alka seltzer plus severe sinus does it treats your worst sinus symptoms, plus that annoying cough. [ breathes deeply ] ♪ oh, what a relief it is [ angry gibberish ] understanding you clearly... what is the capital of zimbabwe ? ... the first time you ask with the google voice search. the droid razr maxx hd by motorola. droid recognition. droid powerful. been waiting for the price then hurry, sleep train's beautyre
to eventually hold democratic elections and urged civilians to remain calm. but there are reports of looting and gunfights. 's home has been seen being rated. -- raided. >> is is what rebel fighters left behind in their advance on the capital. the man under attack here is suspected of being a rebel supporter. ,7 kilometers outside the city the damaged buildings and the dead. south african forces have tried but failed to stop the rebel advance. it is the sort of richer vision government supporters meted out to their attackers could be overtaken by looting. >> they are killing us, raping us, looting. they are not allowing us to live. they have taken the state hostage. ,> seen here in better times has become an unpopular president. he has now suffered the same fate. only 10 weeks after the signing of a new power-sharing peace deal. with the celebrations, there was hope of some desperately needed stability. what was to follow was more death, more chaos and suffering for one of the poorest countries in the world. seneca rebels say they brought the president down because of his failure to deliver
elections. there is still heavy fighting in bangui. a peaceful transition is not on the cards. >> paris musharraf has returned home from self-imposed exile, declaring he was to save the country. musharraf spent the past four years in london and dubai, but now wants to take part in elections this may. >> coming home may herald a comeback for musharraf. greeting supporters after stepping off his flight. i've come back, putting my life in danger, in order to save pakistan. >> not everyone in pakistan is happy he is home. the military man made many enemies as president. in 2008, musharraf was forced to quit amid political turmoil i. his political past could come back to haunt him. pakistan's teledyne hates musharraf because he supported george w. bush's war on terror hatesevision -- taliban musharraf because he supported george w. bush's war on terror. police are investigating his role in the death of two political opponents, including the former prime minister. it is alleged musharraf did not do enough to prevent her assassination. some pakistanis are nostalgic for musharraf. he is hoping
my generation. from that decided to go make a film about the election in 2008 and went around the country interviewing members of congress about why they thought people weren't voting in trying to get them to vote and start an organization called generation 19 which took us around the country and registered new voters in 2000 then we did a similar film in 2012 as well is doing all that i went to in my youth where i graduated. >> host: we both were part of the same program then? >> guest: we both went there and it was a great program and a highly recommended. >> host: it allowed you to craft your own curriculum and you can cross-disciplines and that is the point. what did you do? >> guest: my concentration was the intersection of film technology -- technology with an emphasis on social change. >> host: your dedication page reads in part to my mother and father the greatest boomers i know. let's talk about that generation for a minute because they get some flack for some mistakes that they made and have made. >> guest: i think the boomer generation was an incredibly and is an in
and this election recycle. --did they do a lot to bid bridge the gaps. , we sawuld be persuaded the israeli public they even though it may started with mistrust towards obama, it ended this week with a lot of affection. --really did manage to build bridge some of these gaps. he arrived in israel on wednesday. he met with the prime minister and president perez. he traveled to the west bank and he met with the palestinian authority. on friday, meeting with the president of jordan before playing tourist yesterday and he asked to washington about iran's ambitions. here is more from the trip and the comments of the israeli prime has -- president. we discussed the long-range issues for both of our countries. among these is iran's relentless pursuit of nuclear weapons. , you have made it clear that you are determined to preventing iran from developing nuclear weapons. i appreciate your forthright position on this. i appreciate that you have noted that you have acted to orchestrate through determined diplomacy and strong sanctions that are getting stronger yet. and your great success in mobilizing interna
the election. >> look, when you're in the business of trying to form a compromise, get the other side to even come to the table with some commonsense ideas, i'm not surprised that the president is a little lower than 50%. but, you know, we have a budget now, we have a moral document, a blueprint for the policy debates that are going to take place this summer. one of the interesting things that i enjoyed watching was at 2:00 a.m., is that we got a chance to -- i don't get those other channels, george. but, they had an opportunity to talk about the keystone pipeline, they had an opportunity to talk about a biannual budget. this gave the senators more than an opportunity to talk about big issues as well as the budgetary. >> scored a lot of political points with all of those amendments. >> they did. and while this is a normal piece of legislative business, one does wonder why they did it at 5:00 in the morning? but it is a good thing they got it done. >> you're nodding your head? >> yes, it does seem a little strange that they work sometimes on the hill in a slightly banana republican-esque way.
buckley against the layout challenge to the federal election came a knock brought to the supreme court by senator james buckley with ralph winter, bob bork's friend from law school. the federal election campaign act set contribution and expenditure limits for federal offices and i'll submit the federal election commission independent of the president. according to the press to take politics out of politics but for possibly shift the balance of political control as congress in the coming end away from the president challenges. solicitor general bork some of his s.w.a.t team for cases. reran dolphin went to work on a brief in my stand is one of history's curiosities. the brief filed, and i quote, for the attorney general and the united state goes to great lengths to explain why speech and money are interchangeable come away surely would the first amendment is to set a limit on how much "the new york times" could charge him either further serious problems for the contribution and expenditure limit statute. next time somebody tells you a contribution or expenditure limit for an election is
was elected chairman back in 2011, was very aggressive about reaching out to all the different affinity groups or ancillary groups within the republican party, including log cabin republicans. he was the first chairman to make it clear that the corporate culture, as soon as ince priebus came in, was to be inclusive and welcoming. he took a lot of hits for that during his first term as chairman -- >> let me in here. don't filibuster me. none of that played out. we heard none of that in the last election. we heard the exact opposite from the gop in the last election. >> well, what you're talking about is you're talking about the platform which was an anchor around our neck during the election cycle. that was very clear amongst many in leaderships which is why in project is very important. it was a very pragmatic approach, very similar to an after-military option. you do an after-action review. the party was very honest about our weaknesses and why we aren't attracting the voters that we should attract. it's very healthy. this is the first chairman to actually recognize the lgbt members of the pa
the of the elected officials to our city attorney to the treasurer, department head, everyone you see before us that i think understand the importance of having both a colleague at the board. i have the pleasure on this momentous occasion of honoring of swearing in carmen and katie. congratulations. [ applause ] . >> as i said on many occasions it shouldn't surprise anyone in this city that women are helping me run this city in the most intelligent way, the smartest way and they both, carmen and katie have had a reputation, had decisions that they have made all through their professional career that put our residents first and foremost and demonstrated their love for this city, it's workings, for it's representation of the inclusion and for embracing all the policies that this city represents. i'm going to swear in carmen chu first because i have been reminded by my very smart staff that i have to create a vacancy to fill. if i may say a few words about carmen. all of us have enjoyed her leadership on the board. she will no doubt lead the office of the recorder with the same level budgetary, e
to figure out what happened in the last election. all they have done is successfully identified that they need more hispanics and otherwise kickoff the conservatives within the party. chris: how much did that cost to figure that out? >> you're going to give me grief about this. at the white house they are talking about barack obama taking a big trip to africa, this year or next year. there is a lot of debate about which country he picks. chris: i would love to go. >> the white house won't talk about it officially. the president has commissioned a speech on the targeted killing policies which is a source of controversy. personally, it won't change that much. it's an effort to have more transparency. chris: that's a tricky one on the left and right joining together. the big question of the week, when the supreme court takes up gay marriage this had comingwee opinion? be right back. chris: welcome back, the u.s. supreme court takes up gay marriage this week. the big question for us, with polls showing big jumps in public approval for gay marriage, will this court band to move with
, and then i will stop on this, but they came, they had elections for an invisible government in 2005 again, as part of the 911 staying in the rest of the world. and women of course were not permitted to vote, but there was supposed to be another election in 2009, and they were told they might be able to. win 2019, there was no election for anybody. and then in 2011 came after the arab spring, suddenly there was an election. for men, not women. but there was a need to be seen to be giving something. so wedded been promised but not given was then given. so that's largely how things work. as saudi say, some of them say two steps forward, one step back. sounds -- some say two steps back in one step forward. but whatever do you take, it's a small margin for maneuver. yes, sir. >> thank you very much. i'm in communications. i had a chance to go to saudi once, and -- [inaudible]. they are talking about what you mentioned, they're talking about lots of, and it, like the people surround the kingdom. never talk about the king himself. >> it's always someone else's fault. >> in any kingdom or any kin
. in 2004 a ballot measure during the general election amending the ohio constitution to outright ban civil unions was credited with energizing the evangelical vote tipping ohio in bush's favor, w's favor, and winning the election over john kerry. it was a huge issue in 2004 and it was a vote against gay marriage or civil unions after the governor there came out for civil unions twice in that conversation yesterday. "the cleveland plain dealer" was all over kasich's comment saying he revaeld on wednesday that he supports civil unions for same sex couples but don't quote him on that because he goes on to quote his spokesperson reeling in the governor in a statement that reads, this is a statement from the spokesperson, the governor's position is unchanged. he opposes gay marriage and opposes changing ohio's constitution to allow for civil unions. well, so much for that. and he's far from the first republican to feel the heat from the fringe. joining me is msnbc contributor ron reagan and eroll lewis. first a comment on that one. kasich is a fine guy, a bit of a maverick. he's had a very toug
be helpful in this role is that i served as an elected school board member in new haven unified school district for two terms including serving as the president. i was the elected auditor at the city of alameda. i served on the citizens oversight committee and the citizens watchdog committee of the alameda county transportation commission. again, overseeing this exact kind of situation of bond funding and grant funding. i served as the president of the [speaker not understood] community college foundation. i served as the treasurer of the oakland chamber of commerce, many other boards and commissions. and, so, i feel like i could step into this position and play a helpful role quickly. i certainly understand the exact purpose of the committee related to assuring that the dollars are spent in accordance with the agreement set up with the community when they voted to approve the bond. so, assuring the public trust, assuring that new bonds can be approved when the city decides to go back and ask for more bond from the community and assuring that the bond rating of the city remains strong.
elected as national congressman. you had very little access of black people to elite universities. you have almost exclusively a white felise department not only in the bay area but most cities in the country. and exclusions from the political apparatus and machines. so on a local level in this moment of civil rights the legality was that there was little institutional recourse. so people were asking, how do we deal with the civil rights movement? how do we stand up and make businesses and create a source of power? and bobby seale and huey p. newton figured out a way to do that by standing up to police brutality. initially those armed patrols were completely legal. they have studied the law and they knew what distance they needed to stand. when the guns could not be loaded in the cars and when a felon could not carry a handgun and all the very specific legislation around when and where it was legal and they emulated tactics done in l.a. and started to patrol the police and stand up. this is true of the local following. young adults who said that his power. that is standing up. we are g
, including san francisco began granting licenses to same sex couples. on election night, as they elected the first african-american president of the united states, born of an interracial marriage, on that night california voters chose president barack obama and passed proposition 8. stripping same sex california couples of their freedom to marry. which is what made this moment so extraordinary. president obama who just a few months before had articulated his own support for marriage equality stood on the steps of the capitol immediately after taking the oath of office for the second time and articulated that lbgt rights are part of the freedom and fairness in america. >> we the people, declare today that the most evident of truths that all of us are created equal. is the star that guides us still, just as it guided our forebearers through selma and stone wall. >>> so here in nerdland with us to mark this moment in the struggle is california congresswoman and senior democratic whip, barbara lee. alongside the great kenji yoshi yoshino, professor at new york's university law school. lisa d
crossover because they're getting ready to run for election. there is a game play in the senate. this administration wants to show the american public that we can't cut $44 billion between now and september 30 without them experiencing massive pain. they have every intention to make it hurt to get the point that we need to spends every penny we are spending. which is absolutely ludicrous. it's a shame they are doing that because a lot of things -- we are going to have air traffic control towers shut down. they are not shut down because they are too expensive. on average, they cost $wo.3 million less per year to operate. they are shut down to come back with unionized employees in the regular air tower system. so things are not what they seem. we don't have a problem in front of us that we can't solve. what we have is a lack of leadersship and direction to get there. you can compromise on how you save medicare and social security. those compromises have been discussed. they are available. but it's the politics of how we position ourselves so we look good and get re-elected and the
up to easter sunday, the most born day on the christian calendar. the first pope was elected after pope benedict's resignation. >>. >> palm sunday marks the day christ returned to jerusalem before his crucifixion and crowds gathered there to greet him waving palm branches. faithful did so again today at the church where christians believe jesus was resurrected. it is 9:09 on this sunday morning. lots of stuff going on outdoors. of course, people are running in oakland. >> that's right. >> it's cool. it's all right for them. >> yeah, numbers are in the 40s right now, going for a high of 68 in oakland today. and deja vu as we look at the golden gate bridge. we have a few which is s of low clouds and that will keep our beaches cool. but bigger changes are on the way and we've got some rain in our seven-day forecast. we will have that next. >> all right, lisa. thank you. also next, lights out across the world. why things went gash on the golden gate bridge and other landmarks across the globe. and coney island reopens today and coney island reopens today for the first time since super
the litmus test is elections. paul ryan was on the national ticket. he basically argued as did mitt romney, on the very well thing that the house republicans just passed. and the voters cast farvotes for more votes for u.s. senate candidate who is were democrats and far more votes for democratic candidates for the house of representatives. so that's the way we resolve these differences in our country, by elections. it was not really a very close call? >> the fiscal issue has not been resolved i. of course, it hasn't been resolved. hold on, mercedes, let's acknowledge what has happened, the deficits have dropped now for 3 straight years at a rate lower -- faster pace than we have seen since the end of world war ii. nobody wants to acknowledge that. but they are coming down because we did have to engage in emergency spenning when the chitanked and we are coming out of that. we have to have balance -- that's good. but what is really good is job creation and a strong economy. we are seeing the effects of austerity. they would trade our economy for theirs in a success. in realtime, as consequen
of marriage. >> doma is important because congress said it was important. i mean we sent our elected representatives to washington, d.c. and they chose to say that marriage is one man and one woman for purposes of federal law. >> reporter: conservatives say the founding fathers never contemplated gay marriage. >> because it's clearly not what anyone understood as marriage at the time of the framing of the constitution. >> reporter: still, same-sex families pay taxes and don't get the same benefits and the issue with doma really gets complicated if they have children who are also excluded from benefits. >> when we have kids i would like them to be born in a post-doma united states. >> still, california is one of only a handful of states that gives most of the benefits of marriage to same-sex couples and domestic partnerships. one question is whether any ruling by the court on california could affect all of those other states in the same way. fred? >> thanks so much, joe johns in washington. >>> bill clinton signed doma into law when he was president. now he's asking the u.s. supreme c
elections code making miscellaneous amendments to various sections. >> supervisor kim. >> thank you. and i do want to thank the rules committee for their support. this is trailing legislation following our reform of the public finance legislation that we passed at the board last year. we did have to make a couple of date changes. now with the election code, in order to conform with the new public finance structure and mechanism. ~ i do have to make one small amendment today, and that is on page 16 of the ordinance, we are just triking lines 12 and 13, saying that the operative date of this ordinance is january 1st, 2013. we are just triking that. the ordinance will become law 30 days after the mayor signs it since the legislation. so that was just a quick fix up. >> supervisor kim has made a motion to amend. is there a second to the motion? seconded by supervisor cohen. colleagues, without objection that passes. on the underlying ordinance can we take that same house same call? without objection, the ordinance is passed on the first read as amended. item 30. >> item 30 is motion appointing
want to thank you all here for being here. for me, i've been an elected official for a little bit of time, but it never ceases to amaze me how nervous you get when you have all these cameras and people watching you. but i do want to thank you all for being here. i want it really thank all of my colleagues on the board who have taken the time under such short notice to be here with me today. of course, for all the electeds who are here city-wide, dennis, phil of course for being here and taking time out of sacramento for being here, our city administrator for being he, kate howard from the budget office and doing such a wonderful job and stepping in and being here, too. i want to thank you all. and harvey, now i have to turn roles and be a little bit afraid of you. [laughter] >> but i do want to thank everybody for being here and being so supportive. it really humbles me that you are here, you've taken the time to be here to have the confidence to support me in this new adventure. to the mayor, i want to thank you. it's been really my honor, it's been my privilege to serve the peop
for something that's good government and not particularly policy oriented, policy for the elected people. the good government is something that i think we all feel strongly about. city has had some bad experiences with bonds back in just before i was on the grand jury, we had the problem with the school bonds and not -- i think some dissatisfaction with library bonds. we've got a huge bunch of bonds coming up, several hundred million dollars of bonds. this is kind of a management principle that is pretty important as well as transparency which had been mentioned. in the art of war, you don't want people that solve problems, you want people that prevent problems. so, you need to be thinking profoundly ahead of time and making sure the process is working properly. that's kind of a business philosophy that was important. so, i think it's relevant here that with hundreds of millions of dollars of bonds coming up, that we do them properly and not have problems after the fact. i appreciate the consideration and thank you very much for the work you do. >> thank you. any questions? seeing none,
resigning wants to lead his party's election in this may's election. musharraf himself admits that the homecoming is quite, to quote him, "risky" he says. >>> secretary of state john kerry making one more stop on his first trip overseas. an announced visit to iraq. he landed in iraq a short time ago. nick payton walsh has been traveling with the secretary and joins us via phone. what else is john kerry pressing for? >> yes, christi. on top of the agenda here, it is going to be a direct approach from john kerry to prime minister maliki. intervene on flights from iraq to syria delivering fighters to assist the regime. the u.s. is convinced that almost 80 flights and they want to be clear that iraq should, if it wants to have a role in forming the future of syria with the syrian opposition, they should prevent the evidence, they say. they say that inspections done by iraqis aren't enough and those have turned up humanitarian aid but the u.s. is convinced that those flights are carrying weapon supplies. a real trip here for secretary of state. >> all right. nick payton walsh, than
are going to vote in this election? can i see a show of hands? how many people will vote for prop b? >> yes. >> how many of you can think of at least two or three or four people in the next couple of days that you can talk to to make sure that they are voting for prop b, because that is it what it's going to take. we are within one or two percentage points ever victory. the people that you talk to could be the people that make the difference in that election. i want to thank the mayor and our supervisors, and phil ginsburg for putting us on that bond. let's get prop b passed, shall we? [ applause ] so we're going to turn some dirt and we're going to start a library. thank you all for being here today. you made this happen. [ applause ] >> thank you, julie. well-done, julie. thank you. thank you. mr. mayor, will you have the honors. district supervisors, mohammed, phil, julie, come on down here and grab yourself a shovel and we're going to have a countdown. are we ready? let's have a countdown. on the count of 10, 9, 8, 7, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1! north beach branch library!
it this long is surprising. of course, survived the supreme court challenge and the 2012 election. but implementing is going to be tricky. there are a lot of issues. immigration reform is one issue. will immigrants who get their green card be allowed on the rolls of health care. also, employers struggling to find out what is the minimum threshold, what do they have to cover. president obama made the promise if you don't want to change your health care you don't have to. some critics say that's not going to bear out to be true. >> one critical deadline is october 1st when the states have to have their exchanges up and running. what are the chances of making the deadline and what if we don't? >> i think some of those deadlines are probably going to be pushed back. remember, a lot of these states held off on implementation under after the 2012 election. the obama administration does not want to push back the deadlines. remember the bulk of this law is going to go into effect on january 1. that's nine months from now. a lot could be done between now and then. remember the irs is also
election results and in the term was first us by and then hired him out right to manipulate public opinion in america. they also hired a playwright and entertainer because she traveled from country to country and met many heads of states and acted as a courier. one of the stars of gone with the wind worked for the irregulars and he was shot down by germans when he was carrying a document for the irregulars. the germans knew that he was a spy and they thought that his death would be bad for british morale. so the irregulars were a rather romantic plunge and the thought of themselves that way took their cover where they could find it. they had jobs in the embassy and the cover is that they were the air attache. she was supposed to be raising morale in america one of the jobs lost right propaganda which few people realize all of his early stories, there are stories of his escapades as a pilot there were street out front and the -- propaganda. they passed the british information services and were signed off by british officials and then send out to the saturday evening post, ladies home journa
the elections i think netanyahu thought he was in charge and he was rooting for mitt romney, lots of talk about potential attack on iran. the president has since won convincingly, netanyahu has lost some ground at home. i thought reading the pool reports that come back, netanyahu was complaining about all of the challenges he's facing putting together his new government and obama basically said, well, talk to me about it. look what my problems on capitol hill are, and netanyahu said, yeah, but we have more moving parts over here, parts in our country don't move at all, that's the problem. >> i had my doubts about whether or not he was going to shift netanyahu's opinion on him. i felt that from the -- remember that photototof netanyahu and obama sitting on the couch in the white house? >> the oval office. >> do you remember that? >> sure. being lectured. >> the whole body posture and so forth. but some of the video emerging from this trip is so authentic and even the words of netanyahu describing obama and what he means, what obama means to him in this relationship. a true friend. it was very au
with it. the social media was very important for their election. they have been able to har net that engine that they used in the campaign and make it work for them and governing. when they made their press transscripts available on the record, the press secretary james haggard was very interested in getting things out directly. he said in one of his diary entries, to hell with reporters, we'll go directly to the people. those have to do with what the president is doing inside the white house, and then that information spreads. so you can have smgs like "the huffington post" thinking i could simply go around them in the white house press corps is irrelevant. it remains very relevant. >> the white house issues a photograph of the president in any setting, but it is only a society photo. are news organizations becoming reluctant to use that photo? >> it is really quite the opposite. they have started picking up that image on flicker. what you see is the white house photographer is there to photograph the president, not the presidency, not what's happening in the white house, but s
of civil rights that you had only six congressmen, nationally who had been elected as national congressmen. you had very little access of black people to elite universities. you had almost exclusively white police departments not only in the bay area, but in most cities in the country. and fire departments. and exclusion from the political apparatus and machines, right? but on a local level, there was very little electoral representation. so in this moment the reality was that there was very little institutional recourse, right? and so people were asking how do we, how do we do what the civil rights movement did? how do we through standing up and making businesses possible, how to we do that? now, initially, those armed patrols were completely legal. they had studied the law, they knew at what distance they needed to stand, when the guns could not be loaded in the cars, that a felon could not carry a handgun. all the very specific legislation around when and where it was legal, and they emulated some tactics that were being done in l.a. and started to patrol the police and stand up. and in
have a poll in the last two weeks from quinnipiac university which shows that 47%/43%. on election day in the network exit poll 49%/46%. >> hilary rosen -- >> it's clearly moved but the idea the american people are, you know, universally for same sex marriage is just not backed up. >> one of the things you look at, hilary, the youth vote. those who supported that poll, 81% under 30 support marriage equality. where are we as the supreme court takes this up? >> well, and another interesting part about the youth vote, unlike a lot of other issues that ralph works on, the evangelical yaut, according to alex lundry, mitt romney's data analyst, over 60% of evangelical youth support gay marriage. this has taken over the tide. i think the supreme court as good citizens as they are, are really going to decide this case based on what's fair and right based on the constitution, which is, is there a rational reason to treat two sets of loving couples differently under the law? >> david brooks, the country is divided. there are 41 states that either ban it or treat gay marriage as something differe
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